GRITty Persistence

September 1963

X-Men #1

We now have examples of GRIT ads from three different decades! Today’s is from the ’60s, then we’ve got this one from the ’70s and this one from the ’80s.

1963-09_GRIT_P

Wow, just look at how happy that kid is with his sack full of cash! (Is that in pennies?) In this ad the papers sell for 15¢ and you get to keep 5¢, but nine years later the papers sell for 20¢ and you only get to keep 7¢ – I guess that’s inflation for you!

I find it kind of funny that the fact that sellers need to be boys isn’t stressed as highly in this one as in the 1972 ad – maybe at this point they hadn’t even considered that girls might want to sell papers, so didn’t think it was really necessary.

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True GRIT

December 1972

Jungle Action #2

GRIT has longtime been a standard in comics. We’ve already seen an example from 1980, but here’s one from eight years earlier.

1972-12_GRIT_P

In the ad from 1980, it seems like they’re begrudgingly accepting of girls (“I guess we’ll let them sell papers too if we have to…”), but here they’re 100% clear that this is a boys’ club! They make reference to the sellers’ maleness eight times! I guess girls just had to miss out on that 7¢ profit.

The Nitty GRITty Side of Comic Book Ads

April 1980

Buck Rogers in the 25th Century #7

Here’s something you don’t see anymore – ads trying to get kids to sell stuff. GRIT, a newspaper, was probably the most well known (and most widely advertised) of these.

1980-04_GRIT_P

I love how this one plays on kids’ disappointment over having no money – somehow I don’t think that selling a handful of newspapers to family and neighbors (who are only buying it because they feel sorry for you, because really, why would someone buy GRIT when they could just buy their own local newspaper?) is going to make a big financial impact.

And another thing – why do you have to indicate gender when signing up for this? Does is have an effect on how you sell newspapers? Do they send the girls copies of MS. GRIT to sell??

 

(And if you want to see another example of GRIT, check out this ad from 1972!)